Tag Archives: Darth Baiter

The Rise of the Darth Baiter (or I am not your Hairy Fodder)

I am not a black woolly bugger!Da dant da-da dant da-da…don’t you already hear the theme song to Darth Vader just by the title? Maybe I’ve been unknowingly hanging out with members of the Sith to have done something so sinister to move fly fishing closer to the dark side. I’m sure Yoda will not be happy with me. OK, enough dramatics, what in the hay am I talking about?

What else? I’ve got a new fly or at least I call it a fly, the Darth Baiter. Some of you “purists” my have different thoughts about it. But then we all have our own ideas of what is or is not a fly so I will continue on. Ever since moving to the glorious south I have done well catching bass, big bass on flies but even on some of my best days have been humbled by my dark side fishing buddies and their plastic worms. Let me be first in line to say that you just can’t beat those things in their fish catching abilities. So I finally did something about it. I can hear you already, “Oh Craig, what did you go and do now?” No I didn’t go thread a Yum Trick Worm on a wide gap hook and toss it on a fly rod…that truly would be sacrilegious. I just created a PLASTIC fly rod worm fly that looks, acts and feels like something coming straight from the dark side of fishing. But it’s not factory molded, scented, salted or sold in bags of twenty-five. It is hand tied (for the most part) and the majority of the parts are available in fly shops plus with a little help from a larger cousin of the Wee Willie Wiggler (let’s see how up on things you are) I’ve created, probably a monster but the most dang bass catching fly one could ever ask for.

Darth Baiter will lure you to the darkest side of fly fishingMy new creation, which I’m calling Darth Baiter for its proximity to dark side fishing, and its uncanny resemblance to the Overlord, comes with my standard interchangeable weighting system so you can fish this pattern at any depth or speed combination you can think of. Ironically I use more weight when using a floating line to get a jigging action to the fly and no weight at all on a sinking line when scratching the bottom at deeper depths. The stretchy plastic tail is nearly indestructible but is replaceable if it did get damaged. With a double weed guard it is capable of crawling through the thickest of weeds or over logs without hanging up (too much). Tied on a #2/0 or #2 Gamakatsu hook it is streamlined and light, easily casts with a seven weight rod. The smaller version casts well even with a five weight. As with all bass fly fishing, learning to strip strike rather than lifting the rod will get you many times more hook ups.

Choose your Darth Baiter colorFished on a floating line it is more of a jig fly as it sinks to the bottom and any stripping will cause it to hop upwards then dive back down. On a sinking line it crawls across the lake bottom the same way as a standard plastic worm with a slip sinker. Or a Rainy’s Boobie Barbell Eye can be put in place of the weight causing the fly to float and it can be fished on a sinking line much like a Carolina rig or as a top water with a floating line. With any of these methods, always fish it with your rod pointed directly at the fly to keep a straight line connection to aid in strike detection. Strikes can vary from a hard thump to a soft tap-tap or simply the line starts to move off in some direction you didn’t cause it to. Follow any of these with a strong strip strike and the battle will be on.

Just how well does it really work? Let me tell you a fishing story from last season and I’ll try to keep the exaggerating down to a minimum. I got an invite to fish with someone from down state who at the time I only knew from internet fishing sites. He knew of my flies and was relatively new to bass bugging and wanted some pointers. He happens to live on a hunting plantation with several private bass ponds on it so I eagerly jumped at the opportunity. Let me tell you that Southern hospitality still lives for he put me up for the night in their private hunting lodge and invited me to dinner along with his wife, kids and granddad. They had fried up some fresh caught bass fillets (told you I’m no purist) and homemade hushpuppies.

Darth Baiter rules the galaxy...er... the lakeThe next morning we got on the pond only to find the water more than four feet low and most of the shoreline cover sitting high and dry on land. I had planned on trying my Shimmy Fish or my Dixie Wigglers (If you’re a bass bugger you should know these patterns) but quickly it became apparent that this would be an offshore bite. So staying true to my fly fishing background, out came the depth finder, marker buoys and sinking fly lines armed with my Darth Baiter. I spent the first thirty minutes of the day cruising around the lake with the aid of my 3 HP trolling motor scanning with my depth finder to learn the structure layout of the thirty acre pond. After settling on which areas appeared to be most favorable to hold fish, this narrowed down the search. In these areas I proceeded to mark any sunken cover I could find with a buoy then we made milk runs fishing them alternately.

Anchoring a short cast away from these “stumps” we’d cast our sinking lines past them then slowly crawled the fly over them hoping to get a thump. My friend said in the end it was a tough days fishing for this pond due to water conditions but I can only dream of what a good day there must be like. He was disappointed that I only got eight bass between two and five pounds. Personally, I thought it was a great day because he offered me to come back when the fishing was better to make up for it. Want to know the best part? My friend was having a tough time with the sinking line so he went back to his standard casting gear and “real” plastic worms expecting to clean house. He only got two small bass. I feel a disturbance in the force!

I may not be your father but... who's your daddy now